The Truth about the Treaty

by

ANDRÉ TARDIEU

 

Foreword by

EDWARD M. HOUSE

 

Introduction by

GEORGES CLEMENCEAU

 

INDIANAPOLIS
THE BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY
PUBLISHERS

1921

 

 

FOREWORD

There are others who may be able to write as accurately and as interestingly concerning events which led up to the World War and the war itself, but there is no Frenchman, save Clemenceau, who can write with so much authority concerning the Peace Treaty, signed at Versailles, June 28, 1919, as André Tardieu.

M. Tardieu gets nothing second-hand. He was a participant in the events of which he writes. As a member of the Chamber of Deputies, he knew the currents of French political life, and he can write understandingly of the causes leading up to the great conflict. As an officer in the French Army, he can speak authoritatively of that glorious page in history of which he was a part.

This training served him well when he was called to assume a foremost rôle in the making of the peace. No man worked with more tireless energy, and none had a better grasp of the delicate and complex problems brought before the Congress. He was not only invaluable to France, but to his associates from other countries as well. He was in all truth the one nearly indispensable man at the Conference.

Therefore, if one would know of those fateful days in Paris when the Allies of France had gathered from the ends of the earth to have their reckoning with the Central Powers, it would be well to read The Truth about the Treaty, for here it is told by him who knows.

EDWARD M. HOUSE.
New York, March 3, 1921.

 

 

CONTENTS

FOREWARD (EDWARD M. HOUSE)
INTRODUCTION (GEORGES CLEMENCEAU)

I
GERMAN AGGRESSION

II
THE WAR AND THE ARMISTICE

III
THE PEACE CONFERENCE

IV
THE DISARMAMENT OF GERMANY

V
THE LEFT BANK OF THE RHINE

VI
TREATIES OF GUARANTEE

VII
ALSACE AND LORRAINE

VIII
THE SARRE BASIN

IX
WHAT GERMANY MUST PAY

X
HOW THE ALLIES WILL BE PAID

XI
GERMAN UNITY

XII
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE FUTURE OF FRANCE

XIII
HOW THE PEACE IS BEING ENFORCED

XIV
FRANCE, GREAT BRITAIN AND THE UNITED STATES


Introduction