THE AMERICAN COLLEGES
AND UNIVERSITIES IN
THE GREAT WAR
1914-1919

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A HISTORY
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BY

CHARLES FRANKLIN THWING, LITT.D., LL.D.
President of Western Reserve University

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

1920

 

dustcover information:

This volume is an account of the activities of American colleges in the Great War, including data and statistics regarding the number of college men who served, the percentage killed and the participation of college faculties in scientific and other specialist work. The volume also recounts the services of the women's colleges, gives a statement of the financial difficulties which the war brought to the colleges, and contains accounts of the S. A. T. C. as well as the American University in France and the proposed memorials.

 

TO FRANCIS WENDELL BUTLER-THWING,

ANDOVER, HARVARD AND NEW COLLEGE, OXFORD

CAPTAIN, COLDSTREAM GUARDS

 

PREFATORY NOTE

The lack of adequate interpretation of the part which the American colleges, both Northern and Southern, played in the Civil War has long seemed to me a public and an academic misfortune. The possibility of filling this lack lessens with each passing year. The share which the American college and university had in the World's War was at least as significant and impressive as that which the Civil War represents. Early, therefore, in the great struggle, I began to collect materials for its academic history. These materials include evidences furnished directly by hundreds of institutions, as well as the more typical sources of books, pamphlets, and newspapers. To each college officer, who has thus graciously and generously aided me, I am grateful.

This history, concerned with a small social and educational group, has yet largest relations. For it helps to prove that the higher education, in the person of its teachers and students of successive generations, trains men for the service of the nation. While higher education may in certain respects be justly charged with narrowness, it yet, be it affirmed; uses its narrowness for an increase of all human forces and for a worthy bettering of all that makes for the welfare of men. I trust that, from the reading of these pages, one may come, as I come from their writing, with a lordlier hope for the race and for the races.

C. F. T.

Western Reserve University,
Cleveland,
1st January, 1920.

 

                        CONTENTS
  PREFATORY NOTE
I. MOTIVES FOR ENTERING THE SERVICE
II. BEFORE THE ENTRANCE OF THE UNITED STATES
III. FINANCIAL RELATIONS OF THE COLLEGES
IV. THE STUDENTS' ARMY TRAINING CORPS
V. THE ENLISTED
VI. COLLEGE OFFICERS IN WAR SERVICE .
VII. THE SPIRIT OF THE STUDENT SOLDIER
VIII. THE SCIENCES AND THE SCIENTISTS .
IX. THE WOMEN'S COLLEGES
X. THE RELIGION OF THE STUDENT SOLDIER
XI. POETRY AS AN INTERPRETATION OF THE WAR
XII. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
XIII. THE FALLEN
XIV. THE COMMENCEMENTS OF THE WAR PERIOD
XV. SOME ENDURING EFFECTS OF THE WAR ON THE COLLEGES AND THE UNIVERSITIES
XVI. ACADEMIC MEMORIALS


Chapter One