Ninth Series

Bulletin No. 3

INSTITUTE OF
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE DIRECTOR

AMERICAN INFLUENCE ON EUROPEAN EDUCATION
INSTITUTE ACTIVITIES

NEW YORK
December 31, 1928

 

Institute of International Education
INCORPORATED

2 WEST 45TH STREET, NEW YORK

STEPHEN P. DUGGAN, PH.D., LL.D.
DIRECTOR

ARCHIE M. PALMER, M.A.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

MARY L. WAITE
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CYRUS ADLER CHARLES R. MANN
HERMAN V. AMES ALICE DUER MILLER
FRANK AYDELOTTE PAUL MONROE
L. H. BAEKELAND JOHN BASSETT MOORE
SAMUEL P. CAPEN HENRY MORGENTHAU
STEPHEN PIERCE DUGGAN DWIGHT W. MORROW
LIVINGSTON FARRAND C. LATHROP PACK
VIRGINIA GILDERSLEEVE HENRY S. PRITCHETT
CHARLES P. HOWLAND ANSON PHELPS STOKES

MARY E. WOOLLEY

 

Ninth Annual Report of the Director

The Board of Trustees of the Institute
of International Education

Gentlemen:

During the past scholastic year the Director of the Institute spent five months in Europe visiting its correspondents and conferring with educational officials and university authorities. It was a very strenuous journey. In that time he visited France, Spain, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and England. As the Director of the Institute he was everywhere welcomed as a representative of American higher education. The only drawback to the overwhelming hospitality experienced was the fact that it consumed very much of his time and left him almost a derelict when he embarked for home.

He was invited in almost every country to lecture at the universities and did lecture at the universities of Berlin, Vienna and Budapest, at the School of International Relations at Geneva and at the Royal Institute of International Affairs at London. Upon the invitation of M. Luchaire, Director of the Institute of Intellectual Cooperation at Paris, he participated in a two-day conference, April 17-18, of the representatives of the various offices in the different countries which have to do with international educational relationships. The discussion concerning the work of our own Institute in New York was of real service in suggesting to representatives from other countries simplified methods of administrative procedure. The Director was also the substitute for Dr. Robert A. Millikan as the American representative on the League of Nations Commission on Intellectual Cooperation in Geneva during its week's session in July, 1928, Dr. Millikan being unable to be absent from the United States last summer. Upon returning to the United States, the Director reported to the American Committee on Intellectual Cooperation the conclusions adopted by the plenary conference at Geneva which included the plan submitted by Mme. Curie for a more numerous exchange of advanced scientific research students and the plans approved by Professor Gilbert Murray for an exchange of secondary school teachers. The American Committee is now considering the best ways of realizing these plans. Upon the invitation of the Committee in Prague in charge of the unveiling of the heroic statue to Woodrow Wilson on the Fourth of July, the Director delivered the address in English. During his journey he had the opportunity to confer not only with educators and university authorities but with some of the most representative public men such as President Mazaryk, Signor Mussolini, Regent Horthy, Chancellor Seipel, Lord Robert Cecil and officials at the Secretariat of the League of Nations. The experience has confirmed the belief that he has already presented to the Board that more can be accomplished for the advancement of the cause of international cooperation and good-will by personal contact than by almost any other method.

Since his return the Director has used the Monthly Bulletin as the vehicle to express very briefly his views of the educational situation in the different countries visited, devoting one number to each country. That these articles have stimulated discussion on the subjects considered is evidenced by the letters received from teachers in our own institutions making inquiries on many of the topics discussed. In this Annual Report, he does not wish to repeat those views, but would like, however, to draw to the attention of the Board some aspects of the educational situation in Europe which will be of particular interest to Americans:

I

It is amazing to what an extent practically every country in Europe, in fact in the world, is relying upon the education of the masses of its people for national regeneration and progress. That is an old story in the United States, but one has only to go back to pre-War days to be aware of the extent to which illiteracy existed in many European countries and was deliberately allowed to exist in some. But today, the autocracies and oligarchies as well as the democracies are devoting all possible energies to this end. Fascist Italy, Bolshevik Russia, Nationalist Turkey and Revolutionary China are one with nations having older established governments like Great Britain, Germany and Hungary in regarding education as the means of salvation for their people. And it is not the education of their children only that is receiving attention but almost everywhere adult education is also emphasized. Night schools, not only in cities, but in rural districts are providing the rudiments of education to peasants and workers whose education had been neglected in their youth. Illiteracy will not disappear in Europe at once but it is today unquestionably in process of extinction.

II

The second aspect of international education that impresses the thoughtful visitor to Europe is the influence of American ideas in organization and administration. In Continental Europe before the War the dormitory system of student residence was practically unknown. A student boarded out in private families or pensions or lived where and as he could. Last spring the Director visited in Prague, Munich and in other cities some of the finest hostels for students that have been erected in recent years, and the dormitory movement is spreading rapidly. The whole plan which underlies the Cité Universitaire in Paris is based on the scheme of American dormitory life. It is justifiable to mention here the enthusiasm that greeted the news of Mr. Rockefeller's gift for a central house at the Cité Universitaire in Paris. In Geneva, Berlin and London the hope was tactfully expressed that the idea of International House in New York which has already been extended to Chicago and Berkeley might be realized in those centres also where so many foreign students congregate.

III

Another way in which American educational ideas are having an influence in Europe is the gradual loosening of the rigidity that has formerly characterized university administration. This is particularly true with reference to the spread of summer sessions. It would take too much space to enumerate the summer sessions that have been established in Europe, since the War. Practically no country has failed to be influenced. The Institute is the direct representative in the United States of practically all these summer sessions. That brings to it a large amount of work but has excellent results. In some instances the summer sessions have been deliberately modeled upon those of the American institutions with reference to the length of sessions, supervision, assigned readings, etc., so that American students who attend them might receive credit in their home institutions for work done at the foreign universities. The Director looks upon this tendency as of questionable value because he considers the method of obtaining an American bachelor's degree by the accumulation of "credits" as one of the bad features of our educational system. But one can readily understand the attitude of the foreign institutions.

IV

The movement in favor of the Junior Year Abroad described in the Seventh Annual Report and which has been realized with such remarkable results at the Sorbonne in the Cours de Civilisation Française has aroused great interest in other countries having languages of international significance. As the result of discussions with the German authorities, an organization of courses similar to that at the Sorbonne will be established at one of the German universities in the fall of 1930. This will give opportunity to American Juniors to become as familiar with German culture and civilization as the courses at the Sorbonne enable them to become steeped in French culture. The plan was discussed by the Director with the Spanish and Italian educational authorities also but in all probability its realization in those countries will be deferred for some years.

During the past year the Director accepted invitations to make addresses at the annual conferences respectively of the Association of American Universities, the Association of American Colleges, and the American Association of University Professors. He also accepted an invitation to address the faculty of Rutgers University on the English Provincial University, to speak to the Seminar in the course on International Relations at Yale University and to make the Phi Beta Kappa address at Brown University. In fact, were he to accept all the invitations he receives to speak on international relations and international education, he would be able to spend but very little time at the Institute. These facts are mentioned merely to indicate the respect in which the Institute is held, for such invitations are naturally extended to the Director of the Institute, not to a personality.

 

VISITING PROFESSORS

The Institute was able to offer to our institutions of higher education during the year 1928-1929 a splendid group of distinguished scholars as lecturers in the various fields of learning. The following is the list of those who were circuited. The Director is glad to report that the Institute has received letters of commendation concerning all of them from the institutions at which they lectured.

CARL BRINKMAN. Germany. Professor of Political Economy at the University of Heidelberg.

MINNA G. COWAN. Scotland. Chairman of the Higher Education Committee of Edinburgh.

AMERICO CASTRO. Spain. Professor of the History of the Spanish Language at the University of Madrid.

ANDRÉ CHEVRILLON. France. Member of the French Academy, former Professor of Literature at the University of Lille.

JIRI V. DANES. Czechoslovakia. Professor of General Geography of the Faculty of Natural Sciences, Charles University, Prague.

PAUL L. DENGLER. Austria. Director, Austro-American Institute of Education at Vienna.

FERNANDO DE LOS Rios. Spain. Professor of Philosophy, University of Granada.

AUGUSTE V. DESCLOS. France. Assistant Director of the Office National des Universités et Écoles Françaises.

CORA B. S. HODSON. England. Secretary of the Eugenics Society of England and of the International Federation of Eugenics Organizations.

GEORGE KARTZKE. Germany. Assistant Director, Deutsches Institut für Ausländer an der Universität Berlin.

CORNELIUS LELY. Holland. President-Curator of the Delft University; President of the Zuiderzee Board since 1919.

D. PLOOIJ. Holland. Professor of New Testament, Amsterdam University.

PIERRE S. POROHOVSHIKOV. Russia. Formerly Professor of Law, University of Moscow.

GAETANO SALVEMINI. Italy. Formerly Professor of Mediaeval and Modern History, University of Florence.

WILLIAM E. SOOTHILL. England. Professor of Chinese at Oxford University.

THOMAS F. TOUT. England. Professor of History, University of Manchester.

C. BARCIA TRELLES. Spain. Former Professor of International Law, Universities of Murcia and Valladolid.

OTAKAR VOCADLO. Czechoslovakia. Reader in Czechoslovak Language and Literature, School of Slavonic Studies, University of London.

DORA WAGNER. Germany. Studienrat at the State High School for Girls in Dresden.

ALBAN G. WIDGERY. England. Stanton Lecturer on Philosophy of Religion, University of Cambridge.

 

The Director regrets to inform the Board that Professor Jiri V. Danes of Prague, one of the most distinguished authorities on Geography in Europe was run down and killed by an automobile in Los Angeles on April 12, 1928. The Institute officials did everything in their power to be of service to Mrs. Danes on her return to Prague with the body of Professor Danes.

The lecturers who are circuited by the Institute form but a very small part of the many visitors from abroad who come for purposes of educational observation and investigation. A large part of the work of the Institute staff is given to arranging itineraries for such visitors and providing them with the letters of introduction which will secure for them the assistance necessary to enable them best to realize the object of their visits. It would take too much space to enumerate all these visitors but the following are a few of special significance for our work.

VISCOUNT DE CASA AGUILAR, personal representative of the King of Spain, visiting the United States to study educational architecture.

THE DUTCHESS OF ATHOLL, Parliamentary Secretary for Education of Great Britain, to study experimental methods in American schools.

LA MARQUISE D'ARMAILLE, on a mission sponsored by the French Ministry of Agriculture to study the organization and administration of schools of agriculture and landscape architecture for women.

DR. GEORGE BELTRAMI, Professor at the École de Médicine at Marseille on a mission for the Ministry of Public Instruction of France, to study medical education in the United States.

DR. DELGADO CARVALHO, Professor of Sociology at Rio Janeiro. Dr. Carvalho came to the United States to organize an exchange of students between Brazil and the United States.

MRS. BEATRICE ENSOR, Chairman of the International Council of The New Education Fellowship, to study developments in progressive education.

DR. WILHELM GERLOFF, Formerly rector of the University of Frankfort, to study the teaching of economics and finance in our universities.

DR. W. H. HEMER of South Africa, holder of a Carnegie travel fellowship, to study American industrial methods and schools of business.

MR. ALAIN PETIT, an Albert Kahn fellow from England, to study legal and social education in this country.

PROFESSOR N. N. ROUBTZOFF of the Technical College of Moscow, to study the practice in the layout of machines and mechanical equipment of plants, and the practice work performed by students in summer vacations.

DR. LUDWIG SCHMIEDER, official architect of the State of Baden, sent by his government to study university buildings in the United States.

One of the most gratifying features of the work of the Institute consists in the numerous letters of thanks it receives from the many visitors whom it has been able to serve in this way.

 

EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS

A conservative estimate places the number of students from foreign lands studying during the past year in institutions of high education in the United States at not less than ten thousand. In all probability there are several thousand others pursuing preparatory courses in the secondary schools and other schools lower than college grade, which it is estimated would swell the total to approximately fifteen thousand. This large army of earnest young men and women studying in a foreign land represents what is perhaps the greatest student migration in the history of the world. Even in the last decade of the Nineteenth Century when Germany occupied such a pre-eminent place among nations in its attractiveness for the foreign student the number studying at German universities and other institutions of higher education never approached that figure. Nor did the migrations to France in the postwar years ever exceed more than seven or eight thousand foreign students.

One of the most significant features of this international exchange of students is the number of fellowships involved. With the exception of the Rhodes Scholarships, established a quarter century ago by Cecil Rhodes as an agency for bringing the United States and the British dominions into more intimate cultural relations with England and particularly with Oxford, and the American Scandinavian Foundation Fellowships, established in 1911 "to cultivate closer relations between the Scandinavian countries and the United States", international fellowships as such hardly existed before the War. Today the mere enumeration of the opportunities fills a stout book. The promotion of world friendship and understanding by this means is engaging the earnest attention and the best efforts of many far-sighted individuals, foundations, colleges, and other institutions. Probably no organization has been more active in this particular matter than the Institute of International Education. With no funds at its disposal to establish fellowships itself, it administers today two hundred and eleven international fellowships to enable 104 carefully selected American college graduates to study at European universities and 107 equally carefully selected foreign graduates to study at American colleges and universities. This splendid activity has been made possible by the generosity of some 60 American institutions whose names are appended. They have been willing to give free tuition, board, and lodging to the students from Europe and in exchange the American students have received the same advantages in Europe.

The countries with which the Institute maintains student exchanges upon fellowships are Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy and Switzerland. It is the aim of the Institute to extend this activity if possible to other countries which have not already organized it with some other agency. In its international student exchange activities the Institute is represented abroad by the Austro-American Institute of Education in Vienna for Austria; by the Czechoslovak Ministry of Education in Prague for Czechoslovakia; by the Office National des Universités et Écoles Françaises in Paris for France; by the Akademischer Austauschdienst in Berlin for Germany; by the Hungarian Ministry of Education in Budapest for Hungary; by Dr. Piero Parmi, Direttore Generale delle Scuole Italiane all'Estero for Italy, and by the Schweizerischer Schulratspräsident and a committee composed of the rectors of the Swiss universities for Switzerland.

More than sixty representative American colleges and universities are cooperating in this international student exchange movement. Among those which are entertaining these foreign fellowship students are:

Barnard College St. Stephen's College
Bowdoin College College of St. Teresa
Bryn Mawr College Agnes Scott College
Carleton College Smith College
Carnegie Institute of Technology Stanford University
Chattanooga University Syracuse University
Clark University Teachers College of Columbia Univ.
Colgate University Temple University
Colorado School of Mines Trinity College
Drury College Union College
Elmira College Union Theological Seminary
Hartford Theological Seminary University of Buffalo
Harvard University University of California
Haverford College University of Chicago
Hunter College University of Cincinnati
Indiana University University of Iowa
Johns Hopkins University University of Nebraska
Massachusetts Agricultural College University of Oregon
Mass. Institute of Technology University of Pennsylvania
Miami University University of Pittsburgh
Mich. Col, of Mines and Technology University of Wisconsin
Mount Holyoke College Vassar College
New York University Washington University
Northwestern University Wells College
Ohio University Wellesley College
Penn State College Western College for Women
Princeton University Wheaton College
Rollins College Williams College
Rose Polytechnic Institute Wittenberg College
College of St. Catherine Yale University
St. John's College  

Some of the fellowships at the disposal of the Institute are not of an exchange nature. The twelve American Field Service fellowships, which are among the most valuable, are for advanced study at French universities. They were founded by a group of Americans as memorials to the American ambulance drivers in the French service who fell during the War previous to the entrance of the United States in the War. Another most valuable fellowship was entrusted last year to the Institute by the Germanistic Society of America to enable an American student to study some aspect of German civilization at a German university. After a keen competition a fine young American scholar, an instructor in the German language and literature at one of the mid-western universities, was selected and is now studying at the University of Berlin. Still another valuable fellowship devoid of exchange connotation which is administered by the Institute is the Willard Straight Fellowship. This was founded in memory of the late Willard Straight to enable an American student to spend a period of three years in the study of Chinese civilization in China.

While the Director was abroad during the past year he was entertained in Berlin by the Carl Schurz Vereinigung. At dinner of the organization the proposal was made by the Vereinigung that ten American college and university students be invited annually to spend two months traveling through Germany during July and August provided the Institute would select representative men and women to participate in this effort "to promote and deepen the personal and cultural relations between the two countries." The ten students, five men and five women, representing various sections of the country as well as various academic and professional interests, were selected. The reports they made of their experience indicate that they enjoyed a delightful visit through Germany as the guests of the Carl Schurz Vereinigung.

For the past five years the French Ministry of Public Instruction has offered to American men through the Institute of International Education ten teaching positions in French lycées and écoles normales, known as "postes d'Assistant d'Anglais" in the former, or as "postes de Répétiteur d'Anglais" in the latter. In return for board and lodging at a lycée the American gives two hours of instruction in oral English. The lycée is always situated in a university town where the American teacher may pursue his studies. The activity has been successfully administered and is of mutual advantage.

As a means of enhancing and spreading the Junior Year Abroad idea and also of providing the opportunity for American undergraduates to spend the Junior year abroad studying at some foreign university, the Institute also administers a series of undergraduate scholarships under which this year twenty-five Americans are studying in France, two in Germany, and two in England. Last year one of these scholarship holders studied in Madrid and another at St. Andrews in Scotland. It can be anticipated that there will be an extension of the fellowship to other countries in the years to come.

An orientation program and conference for the benefit of the foreign exchange students who came to the United States this fall was held under the auspices of the Institute from September 12 to 18 in a large vacation house located on an eighty-five acre estate at Sandy Hook, Connecticut. The meeting was attended by some sixty students, representing seven foreign countries, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary, Italy, Czechoslovakia, and Norway. During the week, the students were addressed on a variety of topics by a number of well known educators, both American and foreign. The social program of the week was a varied one and gave much pleasure to the foreign students. The purpose of the camp was to employ to advantage the time elapsing between the arrival of the foreign students and the opening of the colleges in helping the students to become acquainted with each other and with American ways, and in the discussion of student problems.

 

PUBLICATIONS

During the year the Institute published and distributed Professor Wenley's report as Director of the American University Union in London in the previous year. It is a splendid exposition of the meaning of the British academic degrees, of the difference between them and the American degrees, and of the wisdom of American students studying for British degrees. The same booklet contains the report of Professor Gary Calkins who was the Director of the Union at Paris. It is a penetrating criticism of methods of scientific instruction in French universities. The Institute also published a booklet containing the names of Russian expatriated professors and their special fields of scholarship who are available for teaching positions in American institutions. The booklet has been of service in securing places for several of them. During the past year the Monthly Bulletin of the Institute which is distributed among the colleges and universities has been much enlarged, enabling the presentation of many more items of interest in international education.

The above is a brief account of the major activities of the Institute. Mention might be made of the several thousand individuals who have visited the Institute during the past year to secure information and advice on a wide variety of subjects and of the enormous correspondence exchanged with people all over the world with the same objects in view. Mention might also be made of the many conferences to discuss specific problems to which the Director has been invited by a great variety of organizations in the United States having international relations. But perhaps sufficient has been outlined to cause the trustees of the Institute to share the pride of the Director in the accomplishment of the past year. He is not unaware, however, of much that might have been accomplished and certainly not unaware of the great amount that remains to be accomplished.

Respectfully submitted,

STEPHEN P. DUGGAN.

New York, December 31, 1928

 

TABLE SHOWING COMPARISON OF THE NUMBER OF FOREIGN STUDENTS
IN THE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES OF THE UNITED STATES DURING RECENT YEARS

(An attempt has been made by the Institute in compiling these figures to include only bona fide foreign students; viz those students who have come to the United States from other countries for the express purpose of pursuing courses in our institutions of higher education and excluding the large number of students of foreign birth who are citizens or residents of this country.)

 

1921-22

22-23

23-24

24-25

25-26

26-27

28-29
Abyssinia  

1

1

4

3

3

1
Afghanistan    

2

1

.

1

2
*Africa

4

6

7

17

3

10

27
Alaska

12
 

2

2

1

5

14
Albania

4

4

5

1

1

2

23
Algeria

1

2

1

1
 

.

1
Arabia  

1

2

4

3
 

2
Argentina

54

57

33

38

35

27

36
Armenia

90

92

101

103

47

38

109
*Asia Minor

6

6

7

7

1

2

4
Assyria        

1
 

2
Australia

23

39

25

39

47

37

41
Austria

23

25

21

20

44

38

47
Azerbaijan    

1
       
Azores  

1

2
       
Belgium

25

45

28

27

27

40

55
Bolivia

21

31

19

26

14

15

20
Brazil

81

56

52

43

31

43

54
British East Africa        

2
   
British Honduras

.

1
 

1

1
   
British West Indies

72

144

98

103

125

121

119
Bulgaria

22

34

23

30

26

38

53
Burma

2

6

3

2

4

2

1
Canada

516

827

684

737

733

984

811
Canal Zone

10

5

6

3

8

8

22
Canary Islands

2
           
*Central America

15

6

9

4

2
 

12
Ceylon

1

3

3

3

8

9

2
Chile

42

42

33

25

23

34

46
China

1255

1507

1467

1561

1317

1298

1196
Colombia

56

57

34

33

34

50

46
Costa Rica

19

18

13

13

9

18

26
Crete      

1
     
Cuba

145

158

139

120

80

109

104
Cyprus

3

5

3

1

3

2

1
Czechoslovakia

59 47

38

48

37

52

55
 
Danzig  

1

.

1
     
Denmark

44

38

37

39

37

41

54
Dominican Rep

9

8

5
 

4

7

9
East Indies

20

35

19

25

10

17

13
Ecuador

9

12

9

8

10

8

8
Egypt

26

34

25

34

26

33

15
England

138

120

170

236

202

229

319
Estonia

3

6

4

8

13

16

14
Finland

9

13

15

23

23

13

26
Formosa

4

2

2

3
 

1
 
France

127

144

126

128

90

103

117
Georgia    

3

1

1
   
Germany

49

63

79

121

124

183

317
Gold Coast  

4

2
       
*Great Britain    

11

1

19

8

2
Greece

93

92

108

113

67

66

127
Guam  

2

2
 

2

1

3
Guatemala

21

21

18

17

20

21

15
Guiana

3

22

13

16

33

31

11
Haiti

3

5

4

5

6

6

16
Hawaii

97

114

85

118

141

175

161
Holland

34

35

27

43

44

42

67
Honduras

14

19

22

20

23

12

18
Hungary

32

36

34

40

44

47

65
Iceland

1

2

2

4

1

4

4
India

180

218

231

202

170

193

213
Iraq        

2

7

13
Ireland

20

38

31

50

49

46

79
Isle of Man          

1

1
Isle of Rhodes 1

1

1
 

1
   

1
Italy

91

74

89

79

117

89

215
Japan

532

658

708

793

685

619

743
Jugoslavia

47

57

34

21

18

16

22
Korea

68

98

96

124

123

114

149
Latvia

2

6

8

12

9

13

10
Liberia

6

7

2

2

5

2

3
Lithuania

10

16

4

13

16

20

50
Malay States  

1

1
   

5

1
Marshall Island    

1
       
Mauritius

4

1
         
Mesopotamia

2

4
 

2

4
 

11
Mexico

244

232

198

201

188

211

269
Newfoundland          

3

5
New Zealand

10

17

18

18

15

19

25
Nicaragua

21

12

10

11

8

8

8
Nigeria

..

..
   

3
   
Norway

67

58

58

65

49

71

80
Palestine

26

20

12

21

31

34

45
Panama

24

28

33

30

42

56

64
Paraguay

2

2

1
   

1

1
Persia

21

18

22

22

17

19

30
Peru

82

69

52

59

37

35

44
Philippines

594

649

591

600

571

745

1073
Poland

38

55

67

63

70

73

110
Porto Rico

195

224

181

190

183

261

233
Portugal

4

8

11

5

6

2

21
Roumania

42

34

24

30

39

28

41
Russia

369

344

391

433

515

340

501
Salvador

8

7

6

9

8

9

4
*Scandinavia      

1
     
Scotland

29

29

38

44

52

54

71
Siam

34

43

30

30

18

14

19
Sierra Leone

2

3

1

4

5
   
Smyrna    

1

3
     
*South Africa

146

137

97

76

63

64

56
*South America

27

6

12

6

1

8

55
South Sea Isles  

1
         
Spain

50

47

52

36

34

42

65
Straits Settlements

1

1
 

1

2

4
 
Sweden

56

64

58

70

54

54

68
Switzerland

43

38

36

76

48

66

89
Syria

22

30

25

15

13

35

53
Tahiti

1

1
         
Tangiers

1

..
         
Tasmania  

1
         
Togoland  

1
         
Turkey

26

42

36

36

29

26

50
Ukraine

4

7

4

5

5

5

15
Uruguay

15

19

13

12

6

4

4
Venezuela

9

13

15

18

20

19

22
Virgin Islands

1
   

3

6
   
Wales

4

2

5

7

7

13

9
*West Africa        

6

7

1
Total

6488

7494

6988

7518

6961

7541

8955

*Country not specified.

 

TABLE SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS IN THE
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES OF THE UNITED STATES 1928-29

ALABAMA  
Alabama Polytechnic Institute

5
Birmingham Southern College

1
Howard College

1
Tuskegee Institute

22
   
ARKANSAS  
Hendrix College

1
   
CALIFORNIA  
California Institute of Technology

43
College of Medical Evangelists

45
College of the Pacific

22
Mills College

8
Occidental College

6
Pacific School of Religion

25
Pomona College

9
San Francisco Theological Seminary

11
Stanford University

102
State Teachers al Fresno

37
State Teachers College, San Diego

8
State Teachers College, San Jose

60
University of California

651
University of California, Southern Branch

112
University of Redlands

7
University of Santa Clara

13
University of Southern California

452
Whittier College

10
   
COLORADO  
Colorado Agricultural College

9
Colorado School of Mines

23
Iliff School of Theology

1
University of Colorado

31
University of Denver

22
   
CONNECTICUT  
Connecticut College for Women

2
Hartford Seminary Foundation

32
Trinity College

2
Wesleyan University

1
Yale University

141
   
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA  
American University

3
Catholic University of America

31
Georgetown University

49
George Washington University

155
Howard University

53
   
DELAWARE  
University of Delaware

1
   
FLORIDA  
Rawlins College

6
University of Florida

7
   
GEORGIA  
Agnes Scott College

1
Emory University

13
Mercer University

3
Wesleyan College

2
   
IDAHO  
College of Idaho

1
University of Idaho

16
   
ILLINOIS  
Aurora College

4
Blackburn College

2
Chicago College of Osteopathy

16
Chicago Theological Seminary

9
Greenville College

3
Illinois College

3
Illinois State Normal University

1
Illinois Wesleyan University

1
Knox College

3
Lewis Institute

3
Loyola University

48
Meadville Theological School

8
Moody Bible Institute

101
National Kindergarten and Elementary College

9
North Central College

8
Northwestern University

82
Rockford College

2
Shurtleff College

1
University of Chicago

266
University of Illinois

117
Wheaton College

27
   
INDIANA  
Butler College

10
DePauw University

12
Earlham College

4
Franklin College

2
Indiana University

19
Purdue University

82
Oakland City College

1
Rose Polytechnic Institute

3
Taylor University

5
Teachers College of Indiana

1
University of Notre Dame

27
Wabash College

3
   
IOWA  
Cornell College

2
Drake University

6
Grinnell College

4
Iowa State College

57
Iowa State Teachers College

1
Morningside College

15
Parsons

2
Simpson College

2
State University of Iowa

36
University of Dubuque

28
   
KANSAS  
Baker University

4
Bethel College

1
College of Emporia

9
Kansas City University

1
Kansas Slate Agricultural College

13
Municipal University of Wichita

9
Ottawa University

1
Southwestern College

4
Sterling College

2
University of Kansas

43
   
KENTUCKY  
Berea College

15
Kentucky Wesleyan College

1
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

21
University of Kentucky

4
University of Louisville

5
   
LOUISIANA  
Louisiana State University

51
Tulane University of Louisiana

15
   
MAINE  
Bates College

3
   
MARYLAND  
Goucher College

1
Johns Hopkins University

92
Morgan College

1
St. John's College

2
University of Maryland

28
Washington College

1
   
MASSACHUSETTS  
American International College

97
Amherst College

4
Boston University

71
Clark University

4
Harvard University

298
Holy Cross College

7
International Y.M.C.A

19
Lowell Textile Institute

5
Massachusetts Agricultural College

3
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy

2
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

210
Mt. Holyoke College

12
New England Conservatory of Music

29
Newton Theological Institution

2
Northeastern University

25
Radcliffe College

20
Simmons College

35
Smith College

14
Tufts College

20
Wellesley College

18
Wheaton College

2
Williams College

2
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

12
   
MICHIGAN  
Albion College

7
College of the City of Detroit

3
Hillsdale College

5
Hope College

3
Kalamazoo College

3
Michigan School of Mining

4
Michigan State College of' Agriculture

22
Michigan State Normal College

7
State College

70
University of Michigan

265
Western State Teachers College

1
   
MINNESOTA  
Augsburg College

11
Carleton College

5
College of St. Catherine

5
College of St. Teresa

9
Hemline University

1
University of Minnesota

199
   
MISSISSIPPI  
University of Mississippi

1
   
MISSOURI  
Central College

1
Central Wesleyan College

1
Kansas City Western Dental College

5
Kirksville College of Osteopathy

16
Missouri School of Mines

7
Park College

9
St. Louis University

124
University of Missouri

24
Washington University

16
   
MONTANA  
Montana State College

8
Montana State Normal College

2
Montana State University

10
   
NEBRASKA  
Cotner College

1
Dorme College

3
Hastings College

7
Nebraska Wesleyan University

2
Presbyterian Theological Seminary

14
University of Nebraska

41
University of Omaha

6
   
NEVADA  
University of Nevada

4
   
NEW HAMPSHIRE  
Dartmouth College .

8
University of New Hampshire

29
   
NEW JERSEY  
Bloomfield Theological Seminary

10
College of St. Elizabeth

1
Drew University

18
New Brunswick Theological Seminary

1
New Jersey College for Women

3
Princeton Theological Seminary

22
Princeton University

40
Rutgers University

5
Stevens Institute of Technology

30
Upsala College

3
   
NEW YORK  
Adelphi College

2
Auburn Theological Seminary

12
Barnard College (Included in Columbia University)  
Biblical Seminary in New York

5
Clarkson College of Technology

2
Colgate University

1
College of the City of New York.

9
Columbia University

899
Cornell University

174
Elmira College

3
Fordham University

3
General Theological Seminary

27
Hamilton College

1
Hobart College

2
Institute of Musical Art

9
Keuka College

4
Long Island Medical College

8
National School of the Y.W.C.A.

1
New York Post Graduate School and Hospital

9
New York School of Social Work

13
New York State College of Forestry

9
New York University

140
Pratt Institute

39
Presbyterian Hospital. School of Nursing

37
St. Lawrence University

2
St. Luke's Hospital. School of Nursing

9
State Teachers College

1
Syracuse University

18
Teachers College (Included in Columbia University)  
Union College

6
Union Theological Seminary (Included in Columbia University)  
University of Buffalo

42
University of Rochester

3
Vassar College

9
Wells College

2
   
NORTH CAROLINA  
Duke University

11
Elon College

2
Greensboro College

2
Guilford College

2
North Carolina State College of Agriculture

14
North Carolina State College

14
University of North Carolina

5
   
NORTH DAKOTA,  
North Dakota Agricultural College

3
University of North Dakota

6
   
OHIO  
Antioch College

6
Baldwin Wallace College

6
Bluffton College

7
College of Wooster

10
Demson University

5
Hiram College

1
Kenyon College

2
Marietta College

1
Miami University

3
Mt. Union College

8
Muskingum College

3
Oberlin College

8
Ohio State University

56
Ohio Wesleyan University

16
Ohio University

3
Otterbein University

1
Toledo University

4
University of Akron

7
University of Cincinnati

48
Western College for Women

8
Western Reserve University

3
Wilberforce University

10
Wilmington College

2
Wittenberg College

14
   
OKLAHOMA  
Oklahoma A. and M. College

3
University of Oklahoma

13
   
OREGON  
Albany College

1
Eugene Bible University

4
Linfield College

5
North Pacific College of Dentistry.

47
Oregon State Agricultural College

82
Reed College

11
University of Oregon

48
Williamette University

5
   
PENNSYLVANIA  
Bryn Mawr College

18
Carnegie Institute of Technology

25
Crozer Theological Seminary

3
Drexel Institute

8
Dropsie College: 4 Virginia Polytechnic Institute

4
Elizabethtown College

1
Franklin & Marshall College

3
Geneva College

1
Gettysburg College

1
Grove City College

1
Hahnemann Medical College

9
Haverford College

2
Jefferson Medical College

12
Juniata College

1
Lafayette College

6
Lehigh University

6
Mansfield State Teachers College

1
Pennsylvania College for Women

2
Pennsylvania State College

5
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy

5
State Teachers College

2
Temple University

25
University of Pennsylvania

198
University of Pittsburgh

61
Waynesburg College

3
Woman's Medical College

4
Western Theological Seminary

6
   
RHODE ISLAND  
Brown University

11
Rhode Island State College

1
   
SOUTH CAROLINA  
Citadel Military College

4
Erskine College

1
State A. and M. College

1
   
SOUTH DAKOTA  
Dakota Wesleyan University

3
Huron College

6
South Dakota State College

2
South Dakota State School of Mines

3
University of South Dakota

3
   
TENNESSEE  
Fisk University

4
Maryville College

2
Meharry Medical College

24
University of Tennessee

3
Vanderbilt University

2
   
TEXAS  
A. and M. College of Texas.

24
Baylor College for Women

4
Baylor University

5
Rice Institute

2
Sam Houston State Teachers College

1
Southern Methodist University

10
Texas Christian University

4
Texas Dental College

10
University of Texas

104
   
UTAH  
University of Utah

17
Utah Agricultural College

9
   
VERMONT  
Middlebury College

4
Norwich University

4
   
VIRGINIA  
Emory and Henry College

1
Medical College of Virginia

6
Randolph-Macon College

2
Randolph-Macon Woman's College

8
Roanoke College

4
State Teachers College (Fredericksburg)

1
Union Theological Seminary

1
University of Richmond

11
University of Virginia

1
Virginia Military Institute

9
Virginia Polytechnic Institute

3
Washington and Lee University

3
   
WASHINGTON  
College of Puget Sound

28
State College of Washington

81
State Normal School

5
University of Washington

320
Whitman College

1
   
WEST VIRGINIA  
Davis and Elkins College

1
West Virginia University

25
West Virginia Wesleyan College

1
   
WISCONSIN  
Lawrence College

1
Milton College 4

4
University of Wisconsin 122

122
   
WYOMING  
University of Wyoming

3

*These figures are based upon data provided through the courtesy of the Y.M.C.A.

 

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

Following is a complete list of those published. Those marked with an asterisk are out of print. All others are available for free distribution. The nominal charge Indicated after each bulletin is intended to cover the cost of packing and mailing.

1919

*Announcement of Founding of Institute.

1920

Bulletin No. 1. First Annual Report of the Director. 10 cents.

*Bulletin No. 2. For Administrative Authorities of Universities and Colleges.

*Bulletin No. 3. Observations on Higher Education in Europe.

*Opportunities for Higher Education in France.

*Opportunities for Graduate Study in the British Isles.

1921

Bulletin No. 1. Second Annual Report of the Director. 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Opportunities for Higher Education in Italy. 10 cents.

*Bulletin No. 3. Serials of an International Character. (Tentative List for Libraries.)

*Bulletin No. 4. Educational Facilities in the United States for South African Students.

*Bulletin No. 5. Guide Book for Foreign Students in the United States.

1922

Bulletin No. 1. Third Annual Report of the Director. 10 cents.

*Bulletin No. 2. Notes and News on International Educational Affairs.

Bulletin No. 3. A Bibliography on the United States for Foreign Students. 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 4. A Report on Education in China. 10 cents

1923

Bulletin No. 1. Fourth Annual Report of the Director. 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Guide Book for American Students in the British Isles. 25 cents.

*Bulletin No. 3. Notes and News on International Educational Affairs.

*Bulletin No. 4. Fellowships and Scholarships offered to American Students for Study in Foreign Countries and to Foreign Students for Study in the United States.

Bulletin No. 5. Guide Book for Russian Students in the United States (in Russian). 10 cents.

*Bulletin No. 6. Guide Book for Foreign Students in the United States (Second Edition).

1924

Bulletin No. 1. Fifth Annual Report of the Director (The Problem of Fellowships for Foreign Students in American Universities and Fellowships for American Students in Foreign Universities). 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Hints to American Students Going to France for Study or Research. 10 cents.

1925

Bulletin No. 1. Fellowships and Scholarships Open to American Students for Study in Foreign Countries. 25 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Fellowships and Scholarships Open to Foreign Students for Study in the United States. 25 cents.

Bulletin No. 3. Sixth Annual Report of the Director (Observations Concerning Foreign Centres of International Education). 10 cents.

1926

Bulletin No. 1. Handbook for American Students in France. 25 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Seventh Annual Report of the Director (The Junior Year Abroad, Student Third Class, Summer Schools Abroad, Institute Activities). 10 cents.

1927

Bulletin No. 1. Guide Book for Foreign Students in the United States (in Spanish). 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 2. Guide Book for Foreign Students in the United States (Second Edition, Revised). 25 cents.

Bulletin No. 3. The American University Union in Europe. (British Academic Degrees, France and Modern Science). 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 4. Eighth Annual Report of the Director (American Education in "Backward" Countries, The Expatriated Russian Professor, Unification of Activities in International Education, Institute Activities). 10 cents.

1928

Bulletin No. 1. The Institute of International Education---Its Origin, Organization and Activities.

Bulletin No. 2. Orientation Conference of Foreign Students. (The Psychology of the American). 10 cents.

Bulletin No. 3. Ninth Annual Report of the Director (American Influence on European Education, Institute Activities). 10 cents.

 

ADVISORY COUNCIL

Addams, Jane Lowell, A. Lawrence
Alderman, Edwin A. MacCracken, Henry Noble
Ames, Herman V. Main, J. H. T.
Andrews, Fanny Fern Mannes, David
Blaisdell, James A. Marling, Alfred E.
Blakeslee, George H. Meiklejohn, Alexander
Brookings, Robert S. Millikan, Robert A.
Bruère, Henry Morgan, William Fellowes
Bull, Carroll G. Neilson, William A.
Byrne, James Noyes, Arthur A.
Chase, Harry W. Payne, Bruce R.
Cravath, Paul D. Pendleton, Ellen F.
Cunliffe, John W. Pupin, Michael I.
Davis, Katherine B. Putnam, Herbert
Downer, Charles A. Richardson, Ernest C.
Ely, Richard T. Robinson, Edward
Filene, A. Lincoln Sachs, Julius
Finley, John H. Schwedtman, Ferdinand C.
Fosdick, Harry Emerson Shorey, Paul
Gilbert, Cass Shotwell, James T.
Gildersleeve, Virginia C. Showerman, Grant
Goodnow, Frank J. Stimson, Henry L.
Hadley, Arthur T. Storey, Thomas A.
Hale, George Ellery Sazzallo, Henry
Hazen, Charles D. Thomas, M. Carey
Hibben, John Grier Townsend, John G.
Holt, Hamilton Vincent, George E.
Hughes, Charles Evans Wald, Lillian D.
Jenks, Jeremiah Wilkins, Ernest H.
Kellogg, Vernon Wilson, George Grafton
Keppel, Frederick P. Woodbridge, F. J. E.
Keyser, C. J. Woolley, Mary E.
Lovett, Edgar Wright, Quincy