AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE

International Cookbook

Published by

WESTERN NEW YORK COMMITTEE
for
AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE

4th EDITION

P.O. Box 8
Buffalo 21, N.Y.

$1.00

 

CONTENTS

Introduction
The AFS Story
Table of Conversions
Appetizers
Breads and Pancakes
Soups
Fish
Poultry
Meats
Vegetables
Salads and Dressings
Desserts
Cookies

 

INTRODUCTION

This is the Fourth Edition of the AFS International Cookbook. The recipes in this book have been sent to us by the mothers of former AFS students and by the "mothers" of former Americans Abroad.

When the recipes were written in English, they were used without change. In cases of translation, they were rewritten for ease of understanding. Please refer to the Table of Conversions where necessary. The recipes have been tested and as accurate conversions as possible have been made.

The Committee wishes to thank all the contributors, for without their interest and assistance, the Cookbook could not have been published. We also wish to thank all the AFS Chapters throughout the country for their help, without which it could not have been distributed.

 

AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE
INTERNATIONAL
SCHOLARSHIPS

An Open Door to
Understanding and Friendship

Friendship and increased understanding among their fellow men have been the aims of the American Field Service since 1915, when it was founded as a volunteer ambulance service with the French Armies, carrying thousands of wounded in World War I. After serving again in World War II with the Allied Armies, and therefore with men of many nationalities and beliefs, the idea of a peace-time program to further the basic friendship which exists among all men was revived. AFS had operated its Fellowships for French Universities on a graduate level between the two wars. In 1947 it began its new program on the teen-age level, as being most likely to accomplish the objective. The American Field Service is a private educational organization, and it has no affiliations with any religious, political; or other organization.

An American Field Service International Scholarship is an open door which leads to understanding and friendship among the peoples of the world. Through this door pass students from more than 50 foreign countries to attend American secondary schools for a school-year of study and first-hand experience and, during the summer, American teen-agers from practically every state to study and to live with families abroad --- a two-way exchange of seeing and showing. In this way, future citizens of the world learn to respect the similarities and differences of those who, though they live in different countries, have dreams and efforts similarly directed toward the goal of a peaceful and useful life.

Those who pass through the door are teen-agers, 16 to 18 years old --- when students are most adaptable, open minded, and eager to learn. They have been screened, with the co-operation of educators in their own countries, for personality as well as intelligence, in order that the students chosen be those best qualified to make it an enriching experience for themselves and those with whom they come in contact.

In addition to their studies in the senior class of their American high school, the AFS students are encouraged to participate wholeheartedly in the life of their host community, where they attend the senior year of high school and live in carefully selected American homes as members of their host families on the same basis as the other children in the home. While they learn first-hand of many different aspects of our life --- of our customs, ideals, interests, and problems --- they also broaden our horizons by telling of their own countries and daily life in their own homes.

 

MONEY

The community's participating contribution of $650 per student is approximately 60% of the total cost of the average student. Of the rest, part is paid abroad by the students' families, and much comes as direct charitable donations from individuals, foundations and corporations. All donations are tax deductible. Every dollar helps to expand the program.

 

 

Students to America

Students Abroad
  America Summer School
1947

50
   
1948

83
   
1949

76
   
1950

219

9
 
1951

205

24
 
1952

235

107
 
1953

265

253
 
1954

445

367
 
1955

653

605
 
1956

769

696
 
1957

1,039

724

46
1958

1.171

834

76
1959

1,525

960

149
TOTALS

6,724

4,579

271


EXPLANATION

In U.S.A. recipes, measurements are nearly all given by volume (spoonfuls, cupfuls, pints, etc.)

Recipes from abroad give most measurements by weight (grams).

For practical purposes you can convert measurements directly from weight measurements to volume-measurements, using the following chart, if you are measuring a watery substance such as milk, soup, stew, juices, stewed or canned fruits and vegetables, fresh tomatoes, etc. For the more difficult conversions, the Committee has worked out Charts of Conversions and Equivalents which we hope will be helpful. From the mathematician's point of view they are not absolutely accurate, but for the cook they should be entirely adequate.

dl deciliter   T. tbsp. tablespoon
G. Gr. grams   t. tsp. teaspoon
K. Kg kilogram   3 teaspoons 1 tablespoon
2 gills 1 cup liquid   16 T. 1 cup liquid
2 1/4 dl. 1 cup liquid   2 leaves gelatine 1 T. gelatine and thickens 1 cup liquid
28 grams 1 yeast cake    
C. 8 oz. measuring cup    

Unless otherwise stated, all flour has been measured after sifting.

 

CONVERSION TABLE FOR LIQUID MEASURE

GRAMS

OZ.

CUPS

LITERS

OZ.

CUPS
 

In approx. fractions

fluid measure
 

liquid

liquid

10

3/8

1 T. + 1 t.

1

35-1/5

4-2/5

20

3/4

2-2/3 T.

1/2

17-3/5

2-1/5

50

1-7/8

scant 1/4

1/4

8-4/5

1 + 1 T.

100

3-1/2

scant 1/2

1/8

4-2/5

7/8

454

16 or 1 lb.

2

1 dl.

3-1/2

scant 1/2

500

1 lb., 11/2 oz.

2-1/5
     

1000(1 K)

2 lbs., 3 oz.
       

 

TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS IN DRY MEASURE

GRAMS

Sifted Flour Cocoa Chopped Nuts

Unsifted flour Cornmeal

Gran.Sugar Dried Peas or Beans

Any Fat Butter etc.

Baking Powder

Baking Soda

10

1-2/5 T.

1 T.

3/5 T.

7/10 T.

1 T.

3/4 T.

20

2-4/5 T.

2 T.

1-1/5 T.

1-2/5 T.

scant 2T.

1-1/2 T.

50

7 T.

S T.

3-3/5 T.

3-1/2 T.

5 T.

3-1/2 T.

100

9/10 cup

7/10 cup

scant 1/2 cup

scant 1/2 c.
   

454
1 lb.

4 cups

3 cups

2 cups

2 cups
   

500

4-2/5 cups

3-1/3 cups

2-1/3 cups

2-1/3
   

1000
1K.

8-4/5 cups

6-2/3 cups

4-2/3 cups
     


Recipes